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SOUTH BANK, ASAM

Dirai

& the South Bank estates

THE ESTATE

The state of Assam is the world's largest tea-growing region, and Luxmi's South Bank estates dot the area known as the tea bowl of India. Scattered across

Dibrugarh and Sibsagar, the estates lie in the flood plains of Assam. Tea is grown at sea level, governed by a humid,tropical climate beneficial for tea.

Luxmi’s recent acquisition of four estates in the Moran Circle, Assam adds to its portfolio of plantations that focus on quality, environment and ethics.

27.1910º N, 95.0306º E

SOUTH BANK, ASAM

Dirai

& the South Bank estates

Luxmi’s recent acquisition of four estates in the Moran Circle, Assam adds to its portfolio of plantations that focus on quality, environment and ethics.

THE ESTATE

Situated in the land of the blue hills, green valleys and red rivers, Narayanpur estate is situated on the north of Brahmaputra; an incredibly wide river

that replenishes the soil with mineral deposits. Along with 5 other estates from Sonitpur, Narayanpur forms the North Bank cluster of Luxmi tea estates.

Dirai

& the South Bank estates

Luxmi’s recent acquisition of four estates in the Moran Circle, Assam adds to its portfolio of plantations in the South Bank that focus on quality, environment and ethics.

The state of Assam is the world’s largest tea-growing region, and Luxmi’s South Bank estates dot the area known as the tea bowl of India. The gardens lie in the flood plains of Assam, bearing witness to the ever changing course of a mighty river, along with cultural and historic changes that have taken place over the century.

The Brahmaputra valley carries a rich, complex history of tribes and dynasties that functioned together to resist foreign invasion.

This soon changed with the discovery of an indigenous tea plant that changed the history of the nation.

One of the few empires to have evaded the Mughal onslaught, the Ahom dynasty was able to consolidate its rule over the entire Brahmaputra for over 500 years. Having brokered peace with various tribes, they established a harmonious rule across major portions of Assam.

At the turn of the 19th century, Assam managed to stay shrouded in thick forests and mystery, lying outside the control of the Mughals and Britishers. The accidental discovery of a native tea crop by a British trader in the dense jungles of Assam spelled the dismantling of the Ahom dynasty. It gave rise to large scale commercial production to compete with China and its tea monopoly. The beverage gained mainstream popularity amongst the masses in India.

Several estates still houses relics and monuments of historical significance on their premises. The Attabarie estate hosts a pond dug up by the king Sukhampa (1552 AD – 1603 AD) at the periphery of the estate. Moran and Lepetkatta estates have preserved medieval tanks and tombs built by the Ahom kings that stand testament to the time before the British Raj.

The Brahmaputra valley carries a rich, complex history of tribes and dynasties that functioned together to resist foreign invasion. This soon changed with the discovery of an indigenous tea plant that changed the history of the nation.

One of the few empires to have evaded the Mughal onslaught, the Ahom dynasty was able to consolidate its rule over the entire Brahmaputra for over 500 years. Having brokered peace with various tribes, they established a harmonious rule across major portions of Assam.

At the turn of the 19th century, Assam managed to stay shrouded in thick forests and mystery, lying outside the control of the Mughals and Britishers. The accidental discovery of a native tea crop by a British trader in the dense jungles of Assam spelled the dismantling of the Ahom dynasty. It gave rise to large scale commercial production to compete with China and its tea monopoly. The beverage gained mainstream popularity amongst the masses in India.

Several estates still houses relics and monuments of historical significance on their premises. The Attabarie estate hosts a pond dug up by the king Sukhampa (1552 AD – 1603 AD) at the periphery of the estate. Moran and Lepetkatta estates have preserved medieval tanks and tombs built by the Ahom kings that stand testament to the time before the British Raj.

Home -LTC

Tucked away in the foothills of the Patkai range of hills, the Bhuyankhat Tea Estate dates back to 1915.

Planted by the Baroowahs, the estate was run by the family for nearly a century before being acquired by Luxmi in 2008. In April 1916, the first consignment with 10 chests of Orthodox tea was transported to Calcutta. Loaded into bullock carts, the chests were carried to Borhat, the nearest Railway for shipping. Today the verdant estate spanning 265 hectares, produces 1.6 Million kg of tea annually, in partnership with the Small Tea Growers in the vicinity.

Tucked away in the foothills of the Patkai range of hills, the Bhuyankhat Tea Estate dates back to 1915.

Planted by the Baroowahs, the estate was run by the family for nearly a century before being acquired by Luxmi in 2008. In April 1916, the first consignment with 10 chests of Orthodox tea was transported to Calcutta. Loaded into bullock carts, the chests were carried to Borhat, the nearest Railway for shipping. Today the verdant estate spanning 265 hectares, produces 1.6 Million kg of tea annually, in partnership with the Small Tea Growers in the vicinity.

Home -LTC

One of the most prestigious gardens in the upper reaches of Assam is the Kenduguri Tea Estate, known for its green tea.

Previously owned by the Nahata family, all of the garden’s produce was sold at Amritsar for domestic and export markets. At the time, Amritsar was the green tea market for Kashmir, the Northwest frontier and Afghanistan. Till today, Kenduguri is synonymous with green tea, with locals referring to all green tea as Kenduguri, including the produce from other places. The estate owes its cult status to a pair of brokers- Raja Singh & Kalyan Singh. Working for the British governor in Punjab, the father-son duo traded tea from Kangra in Himachal Pradesh at first. Eventually they became major sellers for green tea across India and cemented the popularity of Kenduguri tea.Till date, the green tea from Kenduguri is sought after by connoisseurs far and wide.

One of the most prestigious gardens in the upper reaches of Assam is the Kenduguri Tea Estate, known for its green tea.

Previously owned by the Nahata family, all of the garden’s produce was sold at Amritsar for domestic and export markets. At the time, Amritsar was the green tea market for Kashmir, the Northwest frontier and Afghanistan. Till today, Kenduguri is synonymous with green tea, with locals referring to all green tea as Kenduguri, including the produce from other places. The estate owes its cult status to a pair of brokers- Raja Singh & Kalyan Singh. Working for the British governor in Punjab, the father-son duo traded tea from Kangra in Himachal Pradesh at first. Eventually they became major sellers for green tea across India and cemented the popularity of Kenduguri tea.Till date, the green tea from Kenduguri is sought after by connoisseurs far and wide.

Home -LTC

The estates of Moran and Sepon, and subsequently Attabarie and Lepetkata were started by The Moran Tea Co, London in 1864. The company was owned by the Smith family who lived in the burra bungalow of Moran estate. The last member of the Smith family was Gordon Smith, who was a fixture of tea estate life in Dibrugarh and helped develop institutions like the Moran College.

The tea of the Moran group was always first rate upper Assam quality. The Moran circle are a group of ten or so tea estates including Dimur Doolong, Halmari and Khongea - which make the best, strongest Assam teas and are prized around the the world.

The estates of Moran and Sepon, and subsequently Attabarie and Lepetkata were started by The Moran Tea Co, London in 1864. The company was owned by the Smith family who lived in the burra bungalow of Moran estate. The last member of the Smith family was Gordon Smith, who was a fixture of tea estate life in Dibrugarh and helped develop institutions like the Moran College.

The tea of the Moran group was always first rate upper Assam quality. The Moran circle are a group of ten or so tea estates including Dimur Doolong, Halmari and Khongea - which make the best, strongest Assam teas and are prized around the the world.

Home -LTC

Dirai

Dirai is close to the Moran estates and right next to Kenduguri. It was planted around 1900 by McNeil and Barry, and has the best Assam clones in our group - Panitola, S3A3, Assam Broadleaf - and it makes both fantastic Orthodox and CTC teas.

Dirai is close to the Moran estates and right next to Kenduguri. It was planted around 1900 by McNeil and Barry, and has the best Assam clones in our group - Panitola, S3A3, Assam Broadleaf - and it makes both fantastic Orthodox and CTC teas.

SHOP MORAN TEAS