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NORTH BANK, ASAM

Narayanpur

& the North Bank estates

THE ESTATE

Situated in the land of the blue hills, green valleys and red rivers, Narayanpur estate is situated on the north of Brahmaputra; an incredibly wide river that replenishes the

soil mineral deposits. Along with 5 other estates from Sonitpur, Narayanpur forms the North Bank cluster of Luxmi tea estates.

Naranyanpur produces 2 Million kilos of tea and every ounce is forward booked ahead of the cup.

26.6960º N, 92.4064º E

NORTH BANK, ASAM

Narayanpur

& the North Bank estates

Narayanpur produces 2 Million kilos of tea and every ounce is forward booked ahead of the cup.

THE ESTATE

Situated in the land of the blue hills, green valleys and red rivers, the north bank estates are situated above the Brahmaputra - an incredibly wide river that replenishes

the soil with mineral deposits. Along with 5 other estates from Sonitpur, Narayanpur forms the North Bank cluster of Luxmi tea estates.

Narayanpur

& the North Bank estates

Naranyanpur produces 2 Million kilos of tea and every ounce is forward booked ahead of the cup.

Situated in the land of the blue hills, green valleys and red rivers, Narayanpur estate is situated on the north of Brahmaputra; an incredibly wide river that replenishes the soil with mineral deposits. Along with 5 other estates from Sonitpur, Narayanpur forms the North Bank cluster of Luxmi tea estates.

Aptly coined as the Life Line of Assam, the river sustains numerous species of flora and fauna endemic to the area.

The silt of the Brahmaputra replenishes the soil and waters the bushes. With over 5 National Parks dotting the periphery of the river, Brahmaputra breathes life into unique ecosystems supporting wildlife along the plains on either sides. The estates play hosts to scores of indigenous species; from migratory elephants, wild boars and dholes to the white winged wood ducks and hornbills that flock the water bodies.

As the meandering tributaries and rivulets cut through the estates, the steep mountains are not too far. Tea grows framed against the picturesque backdrop of the snow capped Himalayas.

Aptly coined as the Life Line of Assam, the river sustains numerous species of flora and fauna endemic to the area.

The silt of the Brahmaputra replenishes the soil and waters the bushes. With over 5 National Parks dotting the periphery of the river, Brahmaputra breathes life into unique ecosystems supporting wildlife along the plains on either sides.

The estates play hosts to scores of indigenous species; from migratory elephants, wild boars and dholes to the white winged wood ducks and hornbills that flock the water bodies.

As the meandering tributaries and rivulets cut through the estates, the steep mountains are not too far. Tea grows framed against the picturesque backdrop of the snow capped Himalayas.

Aptly coined as the Life Line of Assam, the river sustains numerous species of flora and fauna endemic to the area.

The silt of the Brahmaputra replenishes the soil and waters the bushes. With over 5 National Parks dotting the periphery of the river, Brahmaputra breathes life into unique ecosystems supporting wildlife along the plains on either sides. The estates play hosts to scores of indigenous species; from migratory elephants, wild boars and dholes to the white winged wood ducks and hornbills that flock the water bodies.

As the meandering tributaries and rivulets cut through the estates, the steep mountains are not too far. Tea grows framed against the picturesque backdrop of the snow capped Himalayas.

Well manicured tea bushes and tall shade trees share the landscape as the earth folds into soft undulations in the Sonitpur district. The estates in this belt have lived for over 100 years and the plantations house some of the finest clonals.

The Jorashor river flows through the verdant fields of Addabarie, which lie a few kilometres south of Tezpur town. Legend has it that the estate derived its name from the ‘adda’ or wild ginger that grew in abundance on a patch of the estate. It is also said that a section of the estate was once a ‘bheel’, filled with the waters of the river Jia Bhorelli. Country boats would assemble under the shade of a huge ‘Shyam Kathal’ tree at the site and the gathering or ‘adda’ gave rise to the name Addabarie. The tree was believed to house evil spirits and a Maulvi Sahab was engaged to exorcise these beings.

Previous records trace the planting of the first bushes to the middle of the 19th century, when some intrepid planters braved the wildlife infested jungle to grow tea. The Agra Bank Limited, London, owned the land and on 13 June 1892, sold the holding to the British Assam Tea Company Limited. On 1st January 1977, they amalgamated with McLeod Russel India Limited followed by a recent acquisition by Luxmi Tea. Today Addabarie is spread across 1321 hectares, with 724 hectares under cultivation, with an annual crop of 1.5 million kgs.

Dirai

Narayanpur estate on the other hand, is young - most bushes less than 40 years old. The pluckers though are mostly experienced - and steeped in a culture of plucking in 7 day rounds. The result is a malty clean cup.

Well manicured tea bushes and tall shade trees share the landscape as the earth folds into soft undulations in the Sonitpur district.

The estates in this belt have lived for over 100 years and the plantations house some of the finest clonals.

The Jorashor river flows through the verdant fields of Addabarie, which lie a few kilometres south of Tezpur town. Legend has it that the estate derived its name from the ‘adda’ or wild ginger that grew in abundance on a patch of the estate. It is also said that a section of the estate was once a ‘bheel’, filled with the waters of the river Jia Bhorelli. Country boats would assemble under the shade of a huge ‘Shyam Kathal’ tree at the site and the gathering or ‘adda’ gave rise to the name Addabarie. The tree was believed to house evil spirits and a Maulvi Sahab was engaged to exorcise these beings.

Previous records trace the planting of the first bushes to the middle of the 19th century, when some intrepid planters braved the wildlife infested jungle to grow tea. The Agra Bank Limited, London, owned the land and on 13 June 1892, sold the holding to the British Assam Tea Company Limited. On 1st January 1977, they amalgamated with McLeod Russel India Limited followed by a recent acquisition by Luxmi Tea. Today Addabarie is spread across 1321 hectares, with 724 hectares under cultivation, with an annual crop of 1.5 million kgs.

Narayanpur estate on the other hand, is young - most bushes less than 40 years old. The pluckers though are mostly experienced - and steeped in a culture of plucking in 7 day rounds. The result is a malty clean cup.

Dirai

Dirai

A fifty five bed hospital at the garden serves the Addabarie gardens workforce with care.

It also treats the inhabitants of the neighbouring villages, who may not have the means to afford expert medical treatment, free of cost.

With better vernacular signage for policies, clearly demarcated buffer zones, better waste management systems and pollution control, the estate and its community share their commitment to maintaining an eco friendly and inclusive way of living.

A 55 bed hospital at the garden serves the Addabarie gardens workforce with care and also treats the inhabitants of the neighbouring villages, who may not have the means to afford expert medical treatment, free of cost. With better vernacular signage for policies, clearly demarcated buffer zones, better waste management systems and pollution control, the estate and its community share their commitment to maintaining an eco friendly and inclusive way of living.

Home -LTC

Dirai

The factory and infrastructure in these estates have seen a tremendous change under Luxmi’s stewardship.

Upgrading technology and machinery at the factories have afforded more output to the estates. With a total workforce of 12000+ workers, Luxmi’s North Bank estates produce over 6 million kgs of tea. The Narayanpur estate alone makes 2 million kgs of tea every year and every cup has been booked ahead of their harvest. A large portion of this yield is picked up by select domestic buyers from Rajasthan, making their way into fine Indian blends.